Big Ass T-Bone, Grass-fed!

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It’s good to know a grass-fed beef farmer.  Even better is to be a grass-fed beef farmer.  We farm and sell grass-fed beef direct and as such, we need to taste a steak from everything we sell.  This is how we get better

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Today, we tried a 1.146kg T-bone steak.  I like my steak rare, but not everybody does.  With a big steak like this, you can accommodate everyone.  I did this

– preheat oven 180C

– brown the steak in duck fat, I gave it a good few minutes on each side, then did a few quick flips

– stick the pan with the steak in it, in the oven

– after five minutes, I flipped the steak and put it back in the oven

– after another five minutes I pulled it out and let it rest

Those who want medium, got the first cuts.  Those who want medium rare got the inner bits.

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It’s been awhile since I’ve cooked one of these babies.  It fed two men, me and our small four-year-old.  We also have some leftover for a breakfast fry up.

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T-Bone Steak As Captured By My First Generation iPhone

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Lunch today, T-bone steak with brussels sprouts and sweet pots.  Every camera in the house was out of batteries, so I jumped back to old faithful, my iPhone 1.  Still in great condition.  Were it not for the battery life, I’d use this beauty baby as a phone today.

This T-bone was to go to a customer, but it wasn’t as good looking as the rest of the steaks, so we kept it.  Then, I ate it.  I was to share some with my husband, but then, I ate it.  Take one for the team, as they say.

After a brief pat and air dry, into the bubbling duck fat it went.

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The sweet potatoes, also cooked in duck fat, went in while the steak was warming and drying.  iPhone 1 was dropped after this capture.  Duck fat fingers.  As my faithful buddy descended on cold, hard French tile I shrieked these words, ” OH SHIT!! NOOOOOO!!!!!”

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She was fine.  iPhone 1 ( home name iPhonee ) was recovered without shatter ( unlike evil iPhone 4 ).  A slow butter bubbled, thick cut onion awaited the brussels sprout.  I’m sure duck fat was used in this dish as well.  Out loud, I say “brussel sprouts” because “brussels sprouts” doesn’t flow for me.  Why isn’t it Brussels’ Sprouts?  I could probably roll with Brussels’ Sprouts.

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I rested the big boy on the veg and took a few photeez.  I was so hungry, I didn’t wait out the proper steak resting time.

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oh but it was just fine.

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I had a few fans pitching ideas on what to do with that bone.

lunch with iPhone 1

Chicken Fried Steak

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Chicken Fried Steak, a dish so American, you’d think it came from Germany.

With a milky gravy.

Here’s something to do with those steaks you have no idea what to do with.  With the “Gite a la noix” cut, which translated by google is “Cottage has nuts” … now my new favorite nickname for the Gite / Noix cut … you can do one of two things:

1) warm, fry and rest.  The flavor is there, but a bit chewy.  Perhaps with a nice sauce.

2) Pound the crap out of it – a la Chicken Fried Steak.

At a glance:

–  pound flour into beef with salt and pepper

– start some rice

–  chop onion

–  fry beef in hot duck fat

– while beef rests, gently cook onions

–  add flour for gravy

– add milk, make magic gravy

–  grab wine and serve

 

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Behold the Cottage Nuts cut:

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Pound in the flour.

I’ve pounded then floured many times.  This is the first time I’ve pounded the flour in.  I highly recommend this method.  It serves you well when you fry.

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My Ikea countertops can’t handle a pounding, so I use a step stool and a sturdy chopping board.

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Pound the flour into the meat.

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Salt and pepper after.

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Prepare the onions for the milky gravy.

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Take a moment to snap a photo of a cute three-year-old.

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Fry those babies hot hot.  Get the pan hot before the steak goes in.  Otherwise, it will get all melty man.

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After the steak has been fried, dump out most of the fat.  Add a lump of butter and add the onions.

When the onions go all soft, add some flour to make a roux.  Then add a cup and a bit of milk.

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Stir and thicken.

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Serve in strips or cubes or whole. Just don’t forget the gravy!

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Lunch: Steaky Bits with Mushies and Onions served with Slaw

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Gordito, the Bœuf that keeps on giving. Gordito was packed in fleshy, freezy lumps of unidentifiable origin. So when I defrost some beef, it’s always a surprise ( say “sur-preez” ) when it’s all warmed up and ready to go. Today’s beef was steak. I decided to thinly slice some of this entrecôte and brown it, remove and then rest.

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Meanwhile, I slowly buttered up some onions and mushrooms with a clove of garlic. Easy now, don’t go browning the onions. A nice softening is what I was after. Don choo just love onions and mushrooms in a pan bubbling with butter? Yeah, me too.

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I added a splash of wine to grab some flavor off the bottom of then pan. I added back in the steaky bits and lunch was ready. I served with cole slaw. My cole slaw is actually a slaw copy made by Coles supermarket in Australia. So really we call it Coles’ slaw. The essential ingredient to bring it from American Slaw to Coles’ Slaw is the addition of some chopped carrots with all the rest of the mayo and things.

… and yes, that is a lime-green Porsche Cayman by the steaky bits.  This photo was not fluffed.  You’ve just peeked onto my kitchen bench into my world where a Kinder Egg Surprise toy makes it to my workspace and is not moved until after I snap a photo and realize, ” oh look, a Cayman.”

I’m Salivating

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and just like a dog owned by Pavlov, I see steak == my mouth waters with anticipation. On this American holiday, we are having steak-frites.

Tomorrow will be spent running around town collecting random turkey parts to assemble for our Thanksgiving Day-after-after dinner. But more on that later …