Foie Gras Tonight

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E.O.M.

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I love deveining foie gras. It means that we will be having foie gras for dinner.

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Brent did the cooking this evening. He kept it simple with with a hot pan for a sizzle on each side. He peppered. He salted, but he used big salt which really gave it that something.
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Served with a Pat original chutney involving green and red tomatoes. Some left over potato purée, just a wee bit, allowed you to do a foie gras, chutney, potato purée layering on your fork for a bite beyond bites. So good. Wish you were here. With foie gras, you need to perfect the balance of salt, sweet and spice. I thought the chutney version did the trick without all the work of fancy sauces. Okay, four more livers to go and we may get our consistency on.

Why Hello Foie Gras, I Missed You

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I’m trying my best to space out the pots of foie gras I have in the fridge. But I could no longer hold out. There are still a few pots left. I see a foie gras omelette in my future.

… And yes, that is a pair of special wire cutters in the background that are supposed to be used for your special bicycle “fixie” collection and instead we use them for fencing. It’s the Gascon way, use what you have and make what you don’t have.

Foie Gras Gras

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The best part about processing foie gras is all the gras that shows up to the party. I Love cooking with foie gras gras. Animal fat has so many good things, it’s a shame it’s been sufficiently dissed in recent years.

I’ll use this gras in many dishes. Morning eggs, veg sauté, special sauce and so much more. I’ve even tried it in my rye bread without issue.

Foie Gras In A Pot

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Today, our fatty duck livers go in a pot for future yumminess.

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Tosca, the house gourmand ( gourmand is French for “tubby” … But don’t tell her that. ), inspects each step.

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Lucy deveins the livers, then salt and peppers each side.
Olivia, the expert duck farmer and foie-gras-in-a-pot extraordinaire, showed us the way with this ratio.

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Tosca really is a big help in the kitchen.
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Boil your pots in a bigger pot for an hour and fifteen minutes. Let them cool for an hour, then stick them in the fridge for up to six months. Though, I can’t imagine it lasting that long. If you have pots of foie gras in the fridge, you’ll be tucking into it like nobodies bidness.

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Don’t forget to make sure the sealy bits are sealed.

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Lunch: Foie Gras and Some Cheese

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The recipe said, “expensive Sauternes, port and muscat grapes.”. I did cassis, floc, dash of white cote de Gascogne and blueberries ( and strawberries savauge, with a little fruit rouge ).

This is how we do it Gascony. It all worked. Foie gras likes it sweet and a bit salty. However you choose to achieve that is your own dang bidness.

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Cheese from left to right:
Pyrenees Mountain cheese, vache. From some dude named Alain. Lovely!

Grassfed Jersey cow cheese. Great for melting. Okay for nibbling.

Young, fresh Jersey cheese. Really nice. I can see its future on salads.